Best Linux Laptop? Dell XPS13 Developer Edition (“Sputnik”) Review

1-month update! See the bottom of the post.

6-month update! See the bottom again.

1-year update! Seriously, see the bottom.

2-year update at the bottom!

Finally, a 3-year update!

Criteria

As a programmer I needed a laptop that was powerful, lightweight, had a keyboard I liked, and ran Linux well (no driver issues especially with WiFi.)

The Dell caught my eye because it’s almost exactly on par, price and specs wise, with a Macbook Air. (The big difference being battery life: Apple is boasting 12 hour stats that nobody else can touch. But I don’t mind carrying around a charger.)

I considered the competitors: Lenovo X1 Carbon, ASUS Zenbook UX301, System76 Galago UltraPro, Chromebook, but either the keyboard layout or Linux compatibility seemed iffy; the Dell is the only one that comes with Linux out of the box aside from System76. It’s obvious that Dell has put significant work into making their laptop compatible with Ubuntu, so I figured I’d support that effort and try it out. The others may work just fine with Linux, or you may be alright with their keyboards/trackpads; up to you! I just can’t stand nub-mice, trackpads that require effort to click, mushy keyboards, layouts that omit function keys, or layouts that place navigation keys in weird places.

Ordering

Firstly, Dell’s website leaves a lot to be desired. The only way to find the XPS13 Developer Edition is to filter by OS and choose Linux; otherwise you’ll only be able to see the XPS13 with Windows. Way to make Linux feel like a second-class citizen!

When narrowing down my final ultrabook options a Dell chat representative popped up, so I asked some questions about the 21 day return policy. The rep’s answers were good enough to convince me to try the Dell out, but he quoted me a system with an Atheros AR9462 a/b/g/n Bluetooth 4.0 network card instead of the Intel® Dual Band Wireless-AC 7260 + Bluetooth 4.0 quoted on the website. He assured me that this was an upgrade, but in hindsight I think there’s a reason the Atheros was cheaper. Many reports online of Dell Support exchanging defective Atheros cards for Intel cards.

Finally, the rep asked me for my credit card info via chat; which, according to my tests, was not encrypted via HTTPS. My warning bells rang all over the place; that can’t be acceptable business/security practice. Finally, my billing address is different than my shipping address, but the quote I received via email didn’t reflect this; I asked about it and the rep assured me my correct shipping address was entered correctly. The order also said it’d take two solid months to ship, but the rep assured me he’d expedite the order and I’d get it much sooner. He finally called me to complete the order (cell phones are more encrypted than HTTP, I guess) but the whole affair felt very shoddy, and my gut was telling me something would go wrong.

A few weeks later (hey, fast!) I got a Fedex tracking number and sure enough it had the destination of my billing address, not my shipping address. Great, so much for promises. Good thing I can forward stuff between addresses without too much pain. None of the rep’s other promised communications happened, just the chat, invoice, and tracking number. Oh well. All’s well that ends well I guess, except I can’t shake the feeling that I’d have been better off trusting my gut and ordering from the website instead of via a representative, and I can imagine some horror scenarios where everything didn’t turn out fine. Definitely go with the website instead.

Update: looks like I saved a few hundred dollars because the Dell rep ordered me an XPS without a touchscreen; so while all the options on the website are expensive models with touchscreens, mine isn’t. Can’t complain, I’m not big on the idea of touchscreen laptops anyway (especially in Linux.)

Update update: looks like I actually got sold the prior-year’s model for a few hundred bucks off. Shitty bait-and-switch, but then again I’m happy with the end result? QUIT PULLING MY HEARTSTRINGS, DELL.

Unboxing

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I was worried at first because the shipping box was pretty beat up from its two trips, but the actual product box was unscratched and very sleek. Apple-inspired plastic wrapping around the laptop itself, fabric scratch-resistant sheets, recycled paperboard, etc. Continue reading

How did HeatSync Labs Start?

I just got a message on the HeatSync Labs Facebook account asking about how we started; figured I’d post it here since it’s a common (and necessary) question:

 

What was the goal when Heatsync was still in its building phase?

To create a place that removes obstacles to people making things; to support a community of creators in Arizona and improve the area; to provide resources to the public, since many of us had just graduated from college and didn’t have those resources anymore.

Can you describe how the Workspace came to be? in terms of development, funding, spreading the word, and so on

First, the founders went around to other similar places to see what worked and what didn’t work about those locations; chatting with other founders and learning from them. Then they went around to local meetups to find others who might be interested in using such a space, or helping somehow. Finally we started meeting up in freely accessible areas before we grew to the point where we outstayed our welcome and needed our own dedicated space. Continue reading

24-volt Relay Controlling 120 volts

 

I decided I wanted to make 120 volt AC things get switched on and off via a 24 volt DC signal — so I bought a nice 10amp, 240volt relay at the local Circuit Specialists electronic store and started wiring stuff up as best to code as I know how. (Every time I see this kind of project online, there’s nothing but comments about how the featured project is totally unsafe… with very little in the way of recommendations on what “acceptably safe” would look like. So please, if you comment, do so by providing reference to alternatives that you’d find acceptably safe.)
relay wiring

First, I figured out which contacts on the relay go to which terminals on the relay socket. A multimeter and 24vdc bench power supply helped a bunch with this.

The first major issue was that this wiring scheme required 120vac power line to be on the same side as the 24vdc signal line — I had hoped to keep them separated on opposite sides, but that’s not how the socket was wired.

 

 

Continue reading

Debunking Lies about ObamaCare

Someone shared with me an article from the Forbes blog The Apothecary (link here: http://is.gd/5rTNEa — not a direct link because I don’t want to support the guy’s PageRank) which claims “Obamacare Will Increase Health Spending By $7,450 For A Typical Family of Four.” There was some debate about whether it’s misleading or not, so I checked it out.

The headline is misleading; “over 8 years” is a significant detail they conveniently omitted to generate clicks. The article projects an increase of $700-900 per year “average health spending for a family of 4.” But that’s a lie too. Well not technically, but practically speaking they’re lying. Here’s what the lie looks like, using the same data the author sourced in the article:

Truth: National Health Spending will increase by $62 billion per year MORE under the ACA than otherwise; in 2012, National Health Spending will be $5 trillion instead of $4.94 trillion.
–>
Lie: “ObamaCare will boost health spending by ‘roughly $621 billion'” (Yeah, that’s OVER TEN YEARS; $62b per year when we’re currently at about ~$3 trillion is way less scary than “600 billion!!1”) Continue reading

Troubleshooting PHP’s exec() or shell_exec() on Windows

So you’re trying to get some random program to work when you run exec() or shell_exec() via PHP in Windows; it works when you run it from the command line, but not when you run the same exact script via the web. Maybe it even returns an elusive 255 retval error code.

The first thing you should do is check file/folder permissions, and use utility commands like whoami, dir, and path to make sure things are sane. Also check if any settings (like cd, or set VARIABLE) are staying across multiple commands; usually they don’t, and you need to string them together && like && this or put them all in a batch file. But if all that doesn’t work, try this.

The last bit of environment to check when running something in Windows is, well, ALL THE ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES. There’s a lot of them. You can see them by running:
set
and likewise change them with:
set VARIABLE=value
In order to get my script working, I had to run set via the command line from the user I wanted it to run as (usually your WWW or Inet user) — after testing that the command actually worked from the command line, of course. Then I ran shell_exec(“set”) via the web and compared the outputs. There were a few missing or different environment variables, like HOMEPATH, TEMP, and APPDATA. Once I made them all match (a batch script helped for some reason) it worked like a charm.

Fixing a Honda civic 2007 si audio jack

The heat killed the 3.5mm line-in port on my car, it wouldn’t sense the cord being plugged in and I had to pull it to one side to get it to work. Fortunately you can pull off the cover and pull out the plug from the front without tearing apart the whole dash. Then I soldered a wire between the sensor pins so it’s always “on” (and I just switch audio sources with the buttons on the nav screen.)

image Continue reading